Speaker

Prof Chris Leishman

Director - Centre for Housing, Urban and Regional Planning, University of Adelaide

Prof Chris Leishman

Professor Chris Leishman is a housing economist, and is Director of the Centre for Housing, Urban and Regional Planning at the University of Adelaide.

Chris is currently an editor for the Urban Studies journal, and was previously Editor-in-Chief of the Housing Studies journal. He has undertaken a large number of studies funded by UK central, devolved and local government departments, for third sector organisations including CRISIS and Centrepoint, and a range of academic funders including the UK’s Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC).

He has led numerous consultancies for private sector firms, third and public sector organisations, and has published extensively in the economics of housing systems and markets, and subjects concerning the interface between individuals’ choices (behavioural analysis), and outcomes in the housing system.

He is perhaps best known for his contributions to understanding the economics of new-build housing supply, the linkages between housing supply and housing affordability, and modelling the housing system as a complex interaction between demographic, housing, labour market, housing supply, and migratory dynamics.

He has informed UK government policy on housing supply and affordability working through the department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), Scottish Government, and the Northern Ireland Assembly.

He has very recently made a significant contribution to recent AHURI funded work on modelling housing need in Australia to 2025.

Related sessions
Thursday 29 August 2019
1.30pm – 3.00pm

Major concurrent session

Planning for our future communities

Following worldwide trends of rapid urbanisation and centralisation of all aspects of life and work, Australians are living in urban areas at higher rates than ever before. What is the impact of population growth on our housing system, services and suburbs? How can we ensure Australia’s swelling major and developing cities remain productive and liveable ... view